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The Lexington Historic Society will be honoring Lexington’s place in Modernist history over the next year:

Lextopia: Still modern after all these years 
In the 1940s and 1950s, Lexington played a pivotal part in launching Mid-Century Modern architecture and design. The Lexington Historical Society will celebrate what has been called “Lexington’s Second Revolution”  with a series of exciting events. Mark your calendar now!

Click here for more details.

 

 

And our friends at FoMA Lincoln have let us know about a house tour they will be hosting:

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Friends of Modern Architecture/Lincoln (FoMA/Lincoln) is hosting a Saturday afternoon stroll through history on October 18th in a one-time-only architectural tour of 4 period homes, all adjacent to each other in one of Lincoln’s most-documented historic neighborhoods.  The houses include a pre-Revolutionary War 1731 Colonial, one of the oldest houses still standing in Lincoln (and never before shown to the public).  Across the street is the showstopping (and quirky) 1895 Queen Anne style house that was built from a Sears, Roebuck & Co. plan by Lincoln builder R.D. Donaldson.  Up the hill is the warm Early Modern house, built first in 1937, renovated in 1975 by Lincoln’s first modern architect, Henry Hoover, and further updated in 2005 by Gary Wolf, for the owners’ changing needs.  The comfortable 1958 Late Modern house, originally designed by prominent Boston architect George W.W. Brewster, is set on the crest of a hill – a grassy, open space at the edge of woodlands.  It was updated and added onto by the architect-designer owners in 2004; the house is now making its public debut.  Get more information on the tour at: http://www.fomalincoln.org/FoMALincoln/Home.html